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Phrasal Verbs starting with ‘To Think’

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He obviously hadn’t thought it _______ properly before starting the venture.

 
 
 

I can’t think _________ any examples  of something she has done well.

 
 
 

Just concentrate on today and try not to think too far _________.

 
 
 

We’ve got all the information we need. We’d like to think it _______ .

 
 
 

I’m thinking ______ going to Japan for the holidays.

 
 
 

It sounds like a good idea but we need to think it ________ to see if it will work.

 
 
 

I don’t want to go to their party but I can’t think ____ an excuse.

 
 
 

When I think ______ on what I did, I feel embarrassed.

 
 
 

Question 1 of 8

Phrasal verbs are usually two-word phrases consisting of verb + adverb or verb + preposition. Think of them as you would any other English vocabulary. Study them as you come across them, rather than trying to memorize many at once. In this lesson you will learn phrasal verbs with – ‘to think’. The examples will help you understand the meanings. If you think of each phrasal verb as a separate verb with a specific meaning, you will be able to remember it more easily. Like many other verbs, phrasal verbs often have more than one meaning.

‘To think ahead’

‘To think ahead’ means to make plans or arrangements for the future.

  • Just concentrate on today and try not to think too far ahead.
  • We’re already thinking ahead to what will happen after the elections.

‘To think back’

‘To think back’means to look back over things that have happened.

  • When I think back on what I did, I feel embarrassed.
  • Think back to when I first lived here and what the house was like then.

‘To think of’

A fact or something that exists means you know it and can suggest it to someone else.

  • I can’t think of any examples of something he has done well.
  • Can you think of any reason I should do it? I’m not going to get paid.

‘To think of’ also means to consider the possibility of doing something.

  • I’m thinking of going to Portugal for the holidays.
  • He’s thinking of starting his own business.

‘To Think out’

‘to think out’ means to prepare or plan something fully before you start doing it.

  • He obviously hadn’t thought it out properly before starting.
  • It was very well thought out. He had obviously spent a lot of time on it.

‘To think over’

‘To think over’ means to consider something carefully before deciding.

  • We’ve got all the information we need. We’d like to think it over.
  • I just needed a bit of time to think it over before I told him what I had decided.

‘To think through’

‘To think through’means to consider something carefully with all the possible consequences.

  • It sounds like a good idea but we need to think it through to see if it will work.
  • I haven’t had time to think it through at all. I don’t know what will happen.

‘To think up’

‘To think up’means to create something using your imagination.

  • I don’t want to go to their party but I can’t think up an excuse.
  • We’ll have to think up a very good reason why we didn’t make the deadline.

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