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Telephone English Phrasal Verbs | Speak English Fluently At Workplace 

 

I always recommend my students to learn phrasal verbs to speak fluent English. An average native English speaker or people who speak English fluently know at least 500-100 phrasal verbs that they use in your daily English conversations. In this English speaking lesson with Niharika, you will learn Phrasal verbs for Telephone. Brush your telephone English to speak more confidently and clearly at workplace.

This spoken English lesson would help you learn some basic Verbs + Prepositions combinations used while speaking over the telephone. Phrasal verbs helps making your English fluent, if you learn around 500 phrasal verbs with their meanings and how to use them in daily conversation, you would almost speak fluent English faster.

Complete Lesson Transcript : –

“Pick up… pick up, pick up pick up…” “Hello, hey this is Niharika here, can you put me through Mr. Johnson please?” “Hello? Hello? Hello?” “Ah! Bad connection…” “well I got jarred off.” Hey this is Niharika here, welcome back in today’s lesson we are gonna look at “telephone phrasal verbs.” Hi friends welcome back well in today’s lesson we are gonna look at “telephone phrasal verbs.” Now we have learnt about telephone skills, we have learnt about different telephone phrases that we end up using when we are having a conversation with someone over the phone, but then what are phrasal verbs? Now here I have eight phrasal verbs that you can use when you are talking to someone or when you’re trying to get connected to someone over the phone. So let’s see what they are and how you would end up using them. The first phrasal verb that I have for you is, “pick up”. Now what does this really mean? Well pick up means, to answer a telephone call. So when you want someone to answer the call, your phone is ringing and you want someone to answer the call, you can end up using the phrasal verb, ‘pick up’. “Hey, could you please pick up the call for me?” So which means you’re asking someone to answer the call for you. Or when you are trying to get connected to someone and that person is not answering, then you think to yourself that, “ah, why he is not picking up?” So which means that, ‘why is he not answering the call?’ okay? So that’s how you can use this phrasal verb. Moving on to the next phrasal verb that we have related to telephone is, “put through”. When do you use this? Well put through is when you are trying to connect someone to somebody. Okay so probably someone calls you and asks for a person that they want to speak to, so they would use the phrasal verb, ‘put through’. For example, “hey could you please put me through the doctor, it’s an emergency.” So you want to get connected to the doctor because you want to speak to him, okay? So when you want to get connected, or when you want to talk to someone, you end up using the phrasal verb, ‘put through’, okay? “Could you please put me through to the dentist please?” Okay that’s how you can use this phrasal verb. Moving on to the next one that I have for you which is, “hang on”. Now we have two phrasal verbs that you can use when you want to ask someone to wait, okay? Or to hold the line. So if you want to use an informal phrasal verb, then you can use, ‘hang on’. “hey could you please hang on for a minute, I’ll put him through.” Okay, ‘hang on’ can be used in an informal way, but in informal way the phrasal verb that you can use is, “hold on”. “could you please hold on for a minute?” Okay, so when you want to ask someone to wait for a minute or so, for a short period, over that phone, then you can use ‘hang on’ or ‘hold on’, alright? Let’s move on to the next phrasal verb that we have for you which is, “get through”. “I can’t get through the operator, what’s wrong?” So what does get through really mean? Well get through means that you are unable to connect to someone. Okay so you desperately want to talk to someone and you’re just not able to get connected, for various reasons. Maybe someone is not picking up the call, someone is not putting you through, okay so for example you call someone and it’s the operator and you know, she’s not putting you through so yes you can’t get through Mr. Johnson. Okay, so there are various reasons that you’re not able to get connected to the person that you want to speak to. So get through is, to get connected. Of course over the phone, alright? To get connected over the phone and that is when you can use the phrasal verb, ‘get through’, alright? The next phrasal verb that I have for you is, “ring back”. “oh I am really busy and I have to ring back or I’ll have to call you back.” So there are two phrasal verbs that you can use when you are telling someone that yes I will call you or I will return your call. So you can either use that, “hey, I’ll have to ring you back, I am extremely busy right now.” Or you can use the phrasal verb, ‘call back’. “I’ll have to call you back because I’m very busy right now”, okay? So when you are telling someone that, ‘yes I will return your call’, these are the two phrasal verbs that you can use in English. Alright, moving on to the next phrasal verb that we have is, “speak up”. “Could you be speak up, hello?” “I can’t hear you, could you please speak up?” Well when you say that speak up or when you are asking someone to speak up, it means that you’re asking someone to speak a little louder, you can’t hear him. Maybe there’s bad Network or the person just speaks very slow and you can’t really hear him. So he’s not audible to you, so you would ask that person to speak up. Okay, so speak up means when you’re asking someone to speak louder, right? Now you don’t have to really scream on top of your lungs, when you’re asking someone else to be louder you can just say that hey I’m unable to hear you, could you please speak up? Okay, so be nice, you don’t have to shout. Moving on to the next phrasal verb which is, “jarred off”. Now you can either use the phrasal verb, “jarred off” or you can use, “cut off”. Now when a telephone conversation is interrupted, probably because the call got disconnected or are probably there’s bad network and you’re not able to get through that person, then you can either use the phrasal verb, “jarred off”, “oh, well the conversation was jarred off”, well because the conversation was interrupted, maybe because of a bad network, bad connection or maybe because someone just hung up. So jarred off or cut off. “Oops! Well the telephone call was cut off.” So cut off again it means when the conversation is interrupted, okay? And then the last phrasal verb that I have for you is, “hang up”. Now hang up can be used in two different ways, when you just disconnect the call you say, “okay, I’ll talk to you later, I’ll have to hang up right now.” So hang up is when you’re telling a person that, yes I’m gonna go ahead and disconnect the call. But it is also used when you are really mad at someone, you’re angry, you just don’t want to speak to that person and you hang up, so you disconnect in a very rude manner without even saying a bye. So my mom was so upset with me, because I was out all night long with my friends and when I called her well she hung up on me. So, “hang up” can be used to disconnect the call. “oh yes, it’s time to get to work, so I’m gonna hang up, I’ll talk to you later.” That is when you can use this phrasal verb but you can also use it when you are telling someone that yes this person was so angry was so mad at me that she hung up on me, okay? So when someone is angry and disconnects the call then you can use the phrasal verb, ‘hang up’. Alright, so these are the eight telephone phrasal verbs that you can use on daily basis. So it’s not just about using various telephone phrases but yes when it comes to talking over the phone or when you’re trying to get connected to someone, then these are the eight phrasal verbs that you can use in English. So start using them if you aren’t using them and I’ll be back with a new lesson soon, till then you take care.

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